Dr. Alveda King Counters Trump ‘Racism’ Claims, Slams Facebook for Blocking Pro-Life Message

Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., joined Breitbart News Sunday on the eve of her uncle’s namesake holiday, hitting back at racism accusations against President Donald Trump and levying her own complaints against ultra-liberal Facebook.

“I agree that President Trump is not a racist. He has done so much,” King told host and Breitbart News Washington Political Editor Matthew Boyle.

“Just now … [Trump signed] the bill that was sponsored by Congressman John Lewis making the Martin Luther King Jr. historic site in Atlanta a national park — the first park to be named after an African-American man,” King continued. She defended the president against a rash of new “racism” accusations supposedly stemming from vulgar remarks Democratic staffers are claiming Trump made about third-world countries that send the United States massive numbers of immigrants.

She went on:

And there’s all other kind of legislation and things that President Trump is passing, including getting a lot of black folks out of jail — he’s working on doing that believe it or not and putting them back to work. And putting America back to work — African-Americans especially because our job rate or our hiring rate was so low and it’s going up along with everybody else’s rate. So President Trump is not a racist. He cares about America period. And he said, “No matter what color our skin is, we all bleed red.” So he sees black people, all people as people. He sees Americans as the people he is supposed to serve and he’s doing that. And he is not a racist. I just really want to say that.

Trump himself similarly dismissed the accusers, which included Rep. Lewis himself, earlier Sunday.

King, who has been increasingly active in conservative politics and reportedly voted for Trump in his presidential campaign, backed him up, saying, “[Trump] cares about this country. He cares about the plight of everybody who’s been under-served, mis-served, mistreated, and he’s equalizing that. And he means that and I believe him, I really do.”

King also expressed her frustration with tech giant Facebook, who recently blocked the pro-life Roe v. Wade documentary — on which she is collaborating with other activists — from raising funds from the social media site’s ads.

“Facebook has been taking it down, not letting the paid ads go forth and all that,” King told Boyle. “Trying to stop the message that’s overtaking this nation and that is that babies in the womb deserve civil rights like anybody else does. Just because they are pre-born or unborn, they’re human beings.”

Facebook later yielded to pressure and allowed the team to crowdfund.

“What this movie does is to show the inhumanity against a certain class of people and that’s the little babies in the womb. Why Facebook is blocking it?” King asked. “I guess some of their followers and people are just complaining about it because they don’t want that message to get out, but the message, in my opinion, is now unstoppable.”

Looking forward to the national holiday named for her uncle, Dr. King explained that she and the King Center like to consider Monday not a “day off” but a “day on.”

“We should take a ‘day on’ of learning to do what my uncle Martin Luther King Jr. — I called him uncle M.L. — said: learn to live together as brothers and as sisters or perish together as fools,” she told Boyle. “We should begin to pray for peace and unity, rather than, in the 1960s, [when] we protested, and sometimes we were angry and things like that. Well now, to unite for peace, we need to pray and seek unity.”

This post originally appeared on Breitbart

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