Prufrock: Mick Jagger’s Lost Memoir, the One World Trade Center Flop, and E. D. Hirsch

Reviews and News:

“I’ve got Mick Jagger’s lost memoir. It’s a little masterpiece, a 75,000-word time capsule. But you may never see it.”

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The One World Trade Center is a huge, expensive flop: “Without knowledge of Ground Zero’s terrible history, Childs’s design would seem even less exceptional, just another super-colossal, shiny skyscraper made possible by all sorts of advanced engineering marvels but unmistakably a thing of the past because of its fundamental lack of forward-thinking urban planning ideas. It seems impossible to see this as anything other than a place-holder for half of what once stood in its approximate place, a feeling reinforced by the eloquent voids of Arad’s heart-rending memorial right in front of it. The most architecturally ambitious portion of the ensemble, Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transportation Hub (commonly called the Oculus), opened to the public in March 2016, though with no fanfare whatever, doubtless to avoid drawing further attention to this stupendous waste of public funds. The job took twelve years to finish instead of the five originally promised, and part of its exorbitant $4 billion price will be paid by commuters in the form of higher transit fares. The fortune spent on this kitschy jeu d’esprit—nearly twice its already unconscionable initial estimate of $2.2 billion—is even more outrageous for a facility that serves only 40,000 commuters on an average weekday, as opposed to the 750,000 who pass through Grand Central Terminal daily. Astoundingly, the Transportation Hub wound up costing $1 billion more than One World Trade Center itself.”

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In praise of E.D. Hirsch.

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Karel Čapek’s 1936 novel War with the Newts shows how the apocalypse comes “bit by bit, at the hands of one of the least threatening creatures on earth.”

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In Case You Missed It:

Looking for God in The Ancient Mariner: Malcolm Guite’s religious portrait of Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

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The homeland of every character in the Iliad mapped.

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The rural influence on modern American art: “While American artists still traveled to Europe for instruction and inspiration in the first half of the 20th century, many also began to focus on things that were new to them closer to home.”

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Dumas’s swashbuckling sequel to The Three Musketeers: “The Red Sphinx may be as subtle as a Verdi opera worked over by the Daily Mail — but who cares, when it’s so enjoyable?”

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Interview: Richard Reinsch talks with Peter Augustine Lawler about the crisis in higher education

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Classic Essay: George Panichas, “The World of the Poet”

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This post originally appeared on Weekly Standard

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